Interestingly fake email sent on behalf of RBI (Reserve Bank of India) via & by fraudualant mail ID


These days, I’ve developed an interim interest in checking out SPAM emails in my mailbox. There are plenty of mails to browse through. be it UK Lottery Scams, International Monetary Fund (IMF) fund Transfer, swiss bank transfers, Break-up notifications from some chick n what not…..

The Symbol of Indian Rupee approved by the Uni...

Indian Rupee Image via Wikipedia

I was very much surprised to read a mail from RBI PLC (rbifundstransfer@rediffmail.com). It didnt take me more than 1/1000 th of a second to think …

“since when RBI has become a PLC”….. Reserve Bank of India Private Limited Company !!!


To add -up some more spice to my entertainment, the mail had email-ID smitha.a24@gmail.com in TO field instead of my emial-ID…. Seems like some Indian Name is used as signatory authority.

ha hhaa haa…… Do go through the mail as copied below…… the language is so funny…. just hang on to the email ahead        🙂

(p.s. DO NOT FALL PRAY to SUCH falsified EMAILS & HELP in CREATING AWARENESS to ERADICATE such ACTIVITIES).

<<<<<<< =================================== >>>>>>

<<<<<<<  =================================== >>>>>>

RESERVE BANK OF INDIA

India ‘s Central Bank

DEPOSITED OF YOUR FUND TO RBI FOR TRANSFER TO YOUR ACCOUNT.

This is to bring to your notice that we have received a cheque of 500,000 Pounds (FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND POUNDS) on behalf of TOYOTA AUTOMOBILE COMPANY in United Kingdom from (DIPLOMATIC MR MORGAN RICHIE) Pacific courier company some days ago, But we could not inform you due to the investigation that was going on about the cheque of 500,000 pounds

This is a very huge amount and has you know that there is a lot of cheque frauds going on all over the world, that is why he took us some time to confirmed that the cheque we received is okay because we don’t want to be fraud in our bank.

We contact the British Government to be aware of this issue should be incase we later face any problem or fraud regarding this payment but the British Government give us 100% assurance that if any problem occur they will be responsible for it and they agree with us.

On behalf of Reserve bank of India (RBI) want to congratulate you has we have confirmed that the cheque is 100% okay that is why we inform you to let you know that cheque is with us.

This is the information and the batch details that i we received from the pacific courier company in other to claim the money for you….

Ref Number: EUM DN 0508-9T6

Batch Number: EUM QY-3LJ4

Serial Number: 20910

YOU ARE TO GET BACK TO US WITH THIS INFORMATION BELOW..

VERIFICATIONSFORM

FULL NAMES:

CONTACT ADDRESS:

TEL/FAX NUMBERS:

AGE:

SEX:

OCCUPATION:

POST CODE:

COUNTRY /CITY /STATE: INDIA

PLEASE FORWARD YOUR INFORMATION TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS BELOW: reservebankindia_remittance@yahoo.in

Looking forward to read from you soonest.

Your’s Sincerely,

MR PRAKASH SHARMA

FOREIGN EXCHANGE REMITTANCE DEPT

R.B.I, INDIA

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e-promotion by ICICI Bank against Phishing mails !!


Kindly make a note of Phishing mails that can hack into your precious bank / Monetary accounts & fetch-out free money.

]

I myself had received such mailers from IDBI Bank asking for personal banking details. On the follow-up with Bank’s Top  officials over mail, it was found that the respective hacking bug was blocked & de-activated.

Here are a few Forensic Triggers mention in the web-poster of ICICI Bank, which is pretty much enlightening.

  • The email ID domain might appear to be Bank name / familiar company / friend’s ID.
  • On moving  the cursor onto the sender’s address, it would reveal mis-matching characters in the URL.
  • The padlock (Security protection) icon would be missing.
  • Generally, mailer will mention the urgent step-by-step action required in order to avoid shut-down of account.
  • It will ask for secret information like user ID, passwords, PINs, CVV number, Credit/Debit Card number, vbyv passcode details, etc.

    Money going e-line

    Phishing Mail

 
 
  Dear Customer, You must have heard of ‘Phishing’ ! It is a trap laid by fraudsters through e-mail. If you reply to the e-mail, you might be ‘phished’ of your confidential banking/credit-card details and end up losing your hard-earned money.

The way to protect yourself against phishing is to identify a phishing e-mail. If you suspect an e-mail to be a phishing attempt, forward it to antiphishing@icicibank.com, and delete from your mailbox. Do not respond to such mails.

 
     
 
 
 
For more details on Phishing, please click here.
 
  Sincerely,
ICICI Bank Ltd.
   
 
epromotion against PHISHING by icici Bank

p.s. – Original structure is modified as to suit the formatting.

 

 

Exposing click fraud – The Anatomy of Online Scam


Internet marketers facing higher advertising fees on search networks are becoming increasingly concerned about a form of online fraud that was thought to have been contained years ago.

The practice, known as “click fraud,” began in the early days of the Internet’s mainstream popularity with programs that automatically surfed Web sites to increase traffic figures. This led companies to develop policing technologies touted as antidotes to the problem. But some marketing executives estimate that up to 20 percent of fees in certain advertising categories continue to be based on nonexistent consumers in today’s search industry.

News context:

What’s new:
Net marketers facing higher ad fees are becoming increasingly worried about an online practice known as “click fraud.”Bottom line:
The persistence of click fraud has exposed a fundamental weakness in the promising business of Internet search marketing, but most advertisers aren’t sure how to address the problem.

In one recent example of the problem, law enforcement officials say a California man created a software program that he claimed could let spammers bilk Google out of millions of dollars in fraudulent clicks. Authorities said he was arrested while trying to blackmail Google for $150,000 to hand over the program. He was indicted by a California jury in June.

Matt Parrella, chief of the San Jose branch of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Northern California, said that case was “not unique.” The problem “is certainly not shrinking, and we’re ready to prosecute people,” said Parrella, whose office handled the Google case.

Click fraud is perpetrated in both automated and human ways. The most common method is the use of online robots, or “bots,” programmed to click on advertisers’ links that are displayed on Web sites or listed in search queries. A growing alternative employs low-cost workers who are hired in China, India and other countries to click on text links and other ads. A third form of fraud takes place when employees of companies click on rivals’ ads to deplete their marketing budgets and skew search results.

Although the extent of click fraud is impossible to measure with any certainty, its persistence has exposed a fundamental weakness in the promising business of Internet search marketing. Google’s pending initial public offering has been widely anticipated as a barometer of online advertising and the post-apocalyptic dot-com climate in general.

“It’s hard to tell how big the problem is, but people are looking at it closer and closer as the cost of search advertising goes up,” said John Squire, vice president of business development of Coremetrics, a Web analytics firm. “Click fraud is a fin sticking out of the water: You’re not sure if it’s a great white shark or a dolphin.”

Unlike advertising in traditional media such as billboards and print publications, “cost per click” Internet ads displayed with specific keyword searches have been promoted as a definitive way for companies to gauge their exposure to potential customers. As a result, U.S. sales from advertiser-paid search results are expected to grow 25 percent this year to $3.2 billion, up from $2.5 billion in 2003, according to research firm eMarketer. From 2002 to 2003, the market rose by 175 percent.

As more advertisers have competed for desirable keywords in their industries, the cost for clicks has risen too. On average, advertisers are paying 45 cents per click this year, according to financial analysts, up from 40 cents in 2003 and 30 cents in the second quarter of 2002. In certain sectors, such as travel, legal advice and gaming, the cost can reach several dollars per click.

But marketing executives say click fraud is pervasive among affiliates of search leaders Google, Yahoo-owned Overture Services and FindWhat.com. In a typical affiliation, any Web publisher can become a partner of these large networks by displaying their paid links on a Web page or within its own search results and then share in the profits with every click.

“There’s a fatal flaw in the cost-per-click model because a ton of marketing dollars can be depleted in a fraction of a second,” said Jessie Stricchiola, president of Alchemist Media, a search-engine marketing firm based in Los Angeles that specializes in fraud protection. “Technology is continuing to be developed that can exploit this pricing model at incredibly high volumes.”

Google’s fraud squad
Google declined an interview for this report, citing the mandatory “quiet period” before its initial public offering, which is expected to raise $2.7 billion. But the company said in a statement that it has been “the target of individuals and entities using some of the most advanced spam techniques for years. We have applied what we have learned with search to the click fraud problem and employ a dedicated team and proprietary technology to analyze clicks.”

In recent documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company also acknowledged the problem as a threat to its revenue, of which 95 percent is derived from advertising. Google and other search networks provide refunds to advertisers when click fraud has been discovered.

The Anatomy of Online Clicks Scam

“If we are unable to stop this fraudulent activity, these refunds may increase,” Google said in its SEC filing. “If we find new evidence of past fraudulent clicks we may have to issue refunds retroactively of amounts previously paid to our Google Network members.”

Google and Overture employ “fraud squads,” or teams of people dedicated to fighting click schemes. But at least two marketing executives say such countermeasures are missing fraudulent clicks that are responsible for between 5 percent and 20 percent of advertising fees paid to all search networks.

Overture spokeswoman Jennifer Stephens refutes that estimate, saying that the numbers likely represent acts of fraud that are ultimately caught. She added that Overture filters most fraudulent clicks with the best antifraud system in the industry, which combines technology and human analysis.

“We take this very seriously; it’s the foundation of what we do,” Stephens said. “If an advertiser has a question about it, we look into all matters.”

Cost-per-click advertising comes in many forms, but it essentially lets marketers gain exposure on a Web site and pay only when people click on their ads. Google and Overture let advertisers bid for placement of paid links, which appear when certain keyword searches are conducted on the networks’ sites or those of third parties that partner with them. Keyword ads can also be distributed according to the content of partners’ sites and displayed on non-search pages. (CNET Networks, which publishes News.com, partners with Google for shared advertising revenue.)

Most advertisers are aware of the click-fraud issue but have not delved into it because of the technical complexities involved. Others are concerned that they could jeopardize their relationships with the powerful search networks if they complain too loudly.

“It is a bigger problem, but folks just don’t want to take the time to track it down because it’s a complex problem,” Coremetrics’ Squire said. Given that some of the largest marketers manage up to 1 million keywords in a campaign, he added, the data can be difficult to crunch.

Danny Sullivan, who runs a quarterly search-industry conference, said many advertisers do not raise their concerns with the ad networks because “they’re afraid that if they complain, it will hurt their free listings.”

Still, more fraud-detection technologies are emerging to help advertisers analyze their campaigns and traffic. Some advertisers and search-engine marketing companies say they are compiling lists of sites that generate a high number of clicks but not sales.

Coremetrics, Urchin and Whosclickingwho.com are just a few that sell technology to examine click rates and sales that result from paid searches. Alchemist Media, which charges flat fees for its consulting services, has detected fraud while acting as an intermediary between search networks and marketers.

In general, Alchemist’s Stricchiola estimates that 10 percent of all search ad clicks could be fraudulent. But she said the rate can reach 20 percent in particular businesses that have been targeted for click fraud.

Roy de Souza, CEO of advertising technology firm Zedo, said his company’s geotracking systems have traced Internet Protocol addresses to detect click operations in China. In describing one common scheme, he said a legitimate site is duplicated under another name, complete with text ads from a search network. A bot would then be trained to click on the ad links that appear on the bogus site, said de Souza, who estimated that click fraud affects 10 percent to 20 percent of today’s search network ads.

Many policing technologies can counter click fraud by analyzing Web traffic logs or surfing behavior. If a page is turned every 1.8 seconds over a period of time, for example, fraud-detecting systems will flag the traffic as suspiciously uniform.

Covert clicks
Human operations can be more difficult to detect because a wide network of people can click on ads from different computers across many regions, without a steady pattern. According to a report in the India Times, residents are being hired to click paid links from home, with the hopes of making between $100 to $200 per month.

In other instances, the source of bogus clicks can be much closer to home.

Joe, the chief executive of an Internet marketing company, enjoys clicking on his rivals’ text ads on Google and Yahoo because his competitor must pay as much as $15 each time he does it. Eventually, such phantom clicks can add up and drain a rival’s budget.

“It’s an entertainment,” said the executive, who asked to keep his name and company anonymous. “Why do you run into a store without dropping a quarter in the meter? You know it’s wrong, but you do it.”

Kevin Lee, chief executive of search marketing firm Did-It, estimates that fraud from such “drive-by” competitive clicks and affiliate scams makes up about 5 percent of the industry’s total sales. Lee concedes that he can only guess at the number, but he does know one thing for sure:

If it gets much higher, he said, “then we should all be getting worried.”

By Stefanie Olsen
Staff Writer, CNET News

Frequent Job Scams & Spams: How can you stop this mess?


Frequent Job Scams Instructions & Safety Manual:

1. Don’t pay a fee upfront. Most legitimate employment agencies don’t charge unless they actually succeed in getting you a job.

2. Be cautious about emails offering help getting a job. Many unsolicited emails are fraudulent.

3. Know exactly what services are being offered. The company may only provide advice or help writing a resume. Some fraudulent employment services simply sell lists of companies that they have gotten from public directories. They may not have contacted those companies directly or know if there are really any job openings.

Job Scam - A Danger
Job Scam – A Danger

4. Document all promises. Print out the information so you can prove what you were promised.

5. Be wary of promises to help get you a government job. If a test is required, the government usually conducts it. No employment service can guarantee that you’ll qualify for a government job or arrange to get you special treatment.

6. Money-back guarantees may not be worth the paper they’re written on. Fraudulent employment services will use an endless string of excuses for why you’re not entitled to a refund.

7. Foreign company offers you a job receiving payments from customers, then wiring funds foreign company may claim it is unable to receive payments from its customers directly you are typically offered a percentage of payments received this kind of “position” may be posted as a job, or offered to you via email.

8. A company guarantees a job but will want a deposit from you.

9. Someone may use us(jobconsultancy) to certify themselves. These claims are fraudulent, as jobconsultancy does not have any role in any transaction.

10. Opportunities abroad: Who does not dream of being paid high wages to work in an exotic locale? Remember, high-paid job opportunities overseas for people who lack significant experience in a particular field, are virtually nonexistent.

11. Business Opportunity Scams: Avoid those work at Home scams.

Don’t be fooled by

# Testimonials
# Guarantees
# Documented ‘proof’
# Huge income potentials

12. This rapidly growing scam – sometimes called mule recruiting – involves fraudsters actively targeting consumers to act as money transfer agents in the sale of goods and services.

Examples:
1. Scammers have now launched a new fraud on internet by offering jobs in oil and other companies with very attractive salaries ranging from US$ 45,000 to 95,000 with many other perks and priviledges like quality single or family housing accommodation, free medical care and insurance for entire family, excellent educational assistance benefits for all dependents, airfares with holiday travel, and excess baggage allowances, paid vacation, official vehicle, and many more gimmicks like these.
These Scammers mostly target the Asian countries as the unemployment ratio is rather very high in these states and majority are living below the poverty line.

2. Some time scammers advertise a job on the behalf of a real company. A bogus telephone or by email interview may take place and after some time you are informed that you are selected for that job. Now you need to secure the job they ask you to send money for your work visa or travel costs to the agent or a bogus travel agent who works on their behalf no matter what the variation, they always involve the job seeker sending them or their agent money, credit card or bank account details.

3. The entire job offer might sound complicated, and this is your job scope:

# Receive payment from Clients.
# Cash Payments at your Bank.
# Deduct 10% which will be your percentage/pay on Payment processed.
# Forward balance after deduction of percentage/pay to any of the offices you will be contacted to send payment to(Payment is to be forwarded either by Money Gram or Western Union Money Transfer). For just 1 to 3 hours per day, you will earn US$4,000. Its too good to be true… and its definitely a scam.
# Data Entry Job.

There are many similar scam like the data entry job scam where they advertise on the net or newspaper that they are looking for work at home typist or data entry worker. These companies usually claim that they have lots of project on hand and they need help to get someone who can work from their own home. They claim that it is cheaper to employed work at home workers as compare with a full time worker. In these job scams, they will usually asked you to pay an application fees or buy a special software that are only available from them before you can start your work at home data entry job.

How To Avoid Them:

# PLEASE DONT WIRE ANY FUNDS, anyone who asks you to do so is a scammer.

# Be aware that legitimate employers do not need your bank account number for “direct deposit” before you have even reported for work.
# FAKE CASHIER CHECKS & MONEY ORDERS ARE COMMON, and BANKS WILL CASH THEM AND THEN HOLD YOU RESPONSIBLE when the fake is discovered weeks later.
# JOBCONSULTANCY IS NOT INVOLVED IN ANY MONEY TRANSACTION BETWEEN OUR EMPLOYERS, CONSULTANTS & EMPLOYEES and any other type of placement agency until otherwise mentioned, and does not offer “any protection” or “EMPLOYEE/CONSULTANT certification”
# PLEASE DONT GIVE OUT YOUR FINANCIAL INFORMATION

# It is important to keep in mind that research is the best defence for combating scams.
# You can swiftly recognize a SCAMMING job employment service by simply doing a bit of decent research.

PLEASE NOTIFY ANY SCAMS or SCAM attempts TO sohandhande@gmail.com

Job Scam
Job Scam

Why your company hates social networks – Is it Bad or Good?


Are you facing the same scenario at your workplace?
Here is why…….

It may be the latter-day media darling, but microblogging service Twitter is getting locked out of corporate networks just like Facebook, MySpace and LinkedIn before it.

Survey of Reasons for Blocking Social Netwworking sites

Survey of Reasons for Blocking Social Netwworking sites

A survey of 709 system administrators released today by the internet security company Sophos shows that 54% of companies are blocking their employees’ access to these top four social networks, with workplace slacking and the security of company data top of the heap of concerns. More detailed results are in the graph above. The poll also revealed that some 63% of administrators fear people share too much company information on social sites. Half of the polled companies reported their networks had been subject to spamming or phishing attacks via social network sites.

Facebook remains the biggest social network risk to companies, says Sophos chief security expert Graham Cluley, due to its popularity. The site has a user base three times the size of the UK population – at around 200 million users – and where people go, criminals always follow.

But with TV megastar Oprah Winfrey joining the ranks of the tweeters lately, supposedly inspiring a million more to join, Twitter is the latest network to go bigtime. “Twitter is something fairly new and there are some companies without a definite policy on it yet,” says Cluley. But that won’t last long.

Twitter suffered its first major attack earlier this month when the Mikeyy worm spread thousands of spam tweets across the network. Although that worm has been put out of action, Cluley says Twitter remains vulnerable to similar attacks.

The social network is also unpopular with network administrators because the 140 character message limit means users typically send out shortened web addresses using services like TinyURL that hide the site a person is being directed to when they click a link.

Some third party Twitter clients – eg TwitterFox – make it possible to see where such links truly go, as does the Twitter search results page. But on the whole, most users are browsing blind.

There’s a form of ‘client blindness’ too: I think the large number of packages you can use with Twitter can lead to confusion amongst users – especially new ones. When you switch between different clients it’s not always clear whether you’ve directed a message to one person, or the whole world. Indeed, Cluley cites the case of a friend who accidentally sent his birth date to the whole Twitterverse.

Unless Twitter ups its security act, the proportion of firms blocking it isn’t going to change any time soon.

by Paul Marks, technology correspondent


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