Risk management as a service using Excel and GigaSpaces


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Risk Management Quick Tip: An Overview


A very nice overview to Risk Management that applies to all the aspects of projects

Fundamentals of Risk Management Tutorial


New Year – New You! The Path to Successful New Year’s Resolutions (via The Simple Mom)


This is a marvellous reading… Deborah has tried to distinguish between Habits & Resolutions… Most important is to notice the 150 comments as of today.. >>>

 

New Year - New You!  The Path to Successful New Year's Resolutions by Deborah Taylor-Hough The biggest thing that seems to keep me from pursuing healthy eating habits or exercise routines for any significant length of time is personal time constraints. Busy, busy, busy. Like many people today, as a single parent, I don’t always have time to get home-cooked meals on the table regularly — much less take the time to actually prepare something nutritious and healthy. My goals for healthy living don’t include becomin … Read More

via The Simple Mom

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Deborah Taylor-Hough is the mother of three, a full-time college student, a displaced homemaker trying to make ends meet on a limited budget, and the author of several older (but still in print) books including the popular Frozen Assets cookbook series. You can visit Debi online at: http://www.SimpleMom.com

 

 

Contd………..

The biggest thing that seems to keep me from pursuing healthy eating habits or exercise routines for any significant length of time is personal time constraints. Busy, busy, busy. Like many people today, as a single parent, I don’t always have time to get home-cooked meals on the table regularly — much less take the time to actually prepare something nutritious and healthy.

The updated USDA food pyramid, published in 20...

Image via Wikipedia

My goals for healthy living don’t include becoming super-model thin. I want to be healthy and strong. I’m not interested so much in how I look as in how I feel. The journey to a healthier lifestyle can begin with two steps: facing up to life’s brevity, and facing up to the truth about your physical condition. Anyone who’s ever been able to wear a size 5 as an adult (like I can!) can’t use the excuse of having big bones anymore.

Over the years, my resolve to get healthy has been strong, but the practical application of my good intentions was sometimes difficult. I attempted a complete eating/exercise program. And failed. Failed miserably. A couple of my friends said the program was a failure. My nagging inner voice tried to tell me that I was a failure. But in retrospect, I don’t think either the program or my personal resolve was the root of the failure. I think I simply bit off more than I could chew at one time.

HABITS vs. RESOLUTIONS

I’ve discovered over the years that there’s a big difference between the formation of habits and simply making resolutions. I believe that one of the keys to successfully implementing permanent change in our lives revolves around instituting new habits. Once a habit is made, we don’t even have to think about it anymore. It becomes second nature.

The secret to successfully instilling new habits is choosing one habit — and only one — we want to work on at a time, and then focusing on that single habit for about four to six weeks (the amount of time it usually takes for a new behavior to become habitual). After the first habit’s been formed, we can choose another habit to work on for a month or so, etc., etc. The failed program I tried awhile back required life changes in the following areas:

1. the amount of food I was eating
2. what I ate
3. how frequently I ate
4. the amount of water I drank
5. aerobic exercise
6. using weights for strength training and body sculpting

All in all, I believe it’s an excellent program … but for someone like me who had allowed herself to fall so badly out of shape and away from healthy habits, attempting to overhaul every area of my life in one swoop was almost a guaranteed failure before it began.

ONE HABIT AT A TIME

But what if instead of trying to change everything at once, I’d picked one idea at a time to work on until it became habitual? Six months before — when I first started feeling the inner motivation to get healthier — I could’ve started with one small step such as drinking enough water everyday. Then the next month maybe I could’ve focused on aerobic walking three times per week. Or eating properly balanced meals. And then the next month focused on the timing of my meals.

In the same six months I would’ve been able to simply — and easily — instill all six of the life changes from that program without ever feeling overwhelmed by trying to do too much all at once. Instead of looking at my assorted food/exercise/health issues and feeling like a failure, I could’ve been making small and steady steps in the right direction each month and come out successfully at the other end.

LET’S GET GOING!

My health goals don’t include becoming super-model thin or running a marathon. I want a healthy, balanced lifestyle rather than an obsessive diet/exercise regime that’s based solely on quick results and what I want to see in the mirror. The mirror isn’t my gauge of success. The energy and stamina and good health that comes for a balanced lifestyle is the success I want to see in my own life.

So, what about you? What single small step can you take this month toward a healthier New Year and a healthier new you?

Choose one habit at a time. Take one step at a time. And before we know it, we’ll all be where we want to be … not just healthy, but health-WISE.

Your 2010 year in blogging…by Team WordPress.com + Stats Helper Monkeys


The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A helper monkey made this abstract painting, inspired by your stats.

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 7,500 times in 2010. That’s about 18 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 28 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 115 posts. There was 1 picture uploaded, taking a total of 208kb.

The busiest day of the year was November 22nd with 111 views. The most popular post that day was Picto-ry of Web evolution…. (tired of writing words) 😛.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were facebook.com, bigextracash.com, bloglovin.com, student-loan-consilidation.com, and 1harga.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for coke a cola, funny monkey, funny monkey pictures, mineral based industries, and mineral based industries in india.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Picto-ry of Web evolution…. (tired of writing words) 😛 November 2010
9 comments

2

Fraud email Gallery: Scam Letters – 542 different examples! December 2009
10 comments

3

Thanda Matlab Coca Cola: But, Thanda nahi hai…… November 2009
1 comment

4

India’s Most Trusted Brands – 2007: Economic Times Brand Equity Survey November 2009

5

India’s Most Trusted Brands – 2008: Economic Times Brand Equity Survey November 2009

 

 

Some of your most popular posts were written before 2010. Your writing has staying power! Consider writing about those topics again.

 

Share these stats with your visitors

Want to share this summary with your readers? Just click the button below,

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Q&A by an Asst. Manager, Forensic Accounting/Audit….a profession that provides VARIETY & requires skillful common-sense & Multi-Tasking !


Q & A session with Matt Sevenoaks, Asst Manager, Forensics @ KPMG.

This reading provides excellent insight to the uncommon path of Forensic Accounting / Audit. Hardly anyone is aware about this fantastic & challenging profession. I’m sure this article would inspire a lot of individuals to follow the info about Forensics.

Forensic Accounting is trigger based logical stream of Accounting & Finance that provides an additional ‘human brain’ touch to the traditional business techniques & practices. It not only engages a professionals’ ability to multi-task & carry out trigger based investigation, but also cultivates his/her CREATIVITY. One needs to be an innovative &  a little creepy thinker to crack a case. “As thy say, you need to step into the shoe of a FRAUDSTER, so as to trap him even before he think of committing the crime!”

Journal of Forensic Accounting

Image via Wikipedia

“Be As Sly As A Fox, But As Innocent As A Lamb.”

Q & A

Name of Employer: KPMG

Location (city): London

Name of Employee: Matt Sevenoaks

Title: Assistant Manager

Department/Division: Forensic

Number of years at firm: 5 years

Number of years in current role: 2 (3 years in audit practice, financial services audit)

Degree (s): Economics and Mathematics BSc from Bristol University.

How did you first decide to enter your industry?

I wanted to train for the chartered accountancy qualification. I wanted a job that provided variety and that was business relevant. Audit would be a good way of doing that, I thought. I also wanted to be in a job that added value to the client.

What first attracted you?

The people. I met a lot of the people at graduate fairs and got a strong impression that it would be a supportive and friendly environment. In audit I knew I’d be working on lots of different teams, so I wanted to be confident that they were people I’d get on with very quickly. I also wanted to progress through a firm and have a career, and knew I’d need support from colleagues, to do things like secondments. I was confident that I’d get that here.

I was attracted to the accountancy qualification because I wanted to gain a professional qualification that would expand my career horizons and offer variety. I wanted something that would add value to me and expand my options, the ACA does this.

What are the typical education requirements?

The requirements are very broad. You need a 2:1 or higher in any discipline to do the ACA. You also need an A in Maths and an A in English at GCSE (please don’t quote me on this, you can confirm the entry requirements on http://www.kpmgcareers.co.uk). Stamina is also important – the ACA qualification is very, very tough. It’s well regarded internationally because it’s so tough. Combining that with doing a day job is quite demanding.

No trend in the degrees people here have done. It’s very broad.

What skills and/or experience are important for success?

We have eight or nine different global skills and behaviours that everyone here needs. Number one is business focus. Being out on an audit talking to a client about the banking industry, you need to be reading the papers so you know what’s going on and stay up to date with current affairs. That adds to your credibility. Number two is building relationships. Working in teams is very important, and you often work alongside the client. Three: making an impact is important. As you progress throughout the firm you’re expected to coach people that are junior to you. Likewise if you have an issue with the client, you need to be able to communicate with some conviction.

Four: leadership is important as need to supervise people and allocate work effectively. As you become more senior you have more and more meetings with the client in which you need to demonstrate strong leadership to increase their confidence in you. Five: problem solving is quite important. There’ll be issues where you’ll need to work out quick work-arounds. For example sending a report if the internet is down at the client’s office. It can also get very technical if you are dealing with clients operating in complex industries such as financial service. Six: you need drive and resilience. Sometimes you’ll be combining your working day with studying at home. You need to take a very a strong positive attitude. Also, you might have engagements where you’re working long hours, or away from home.

You need to make your own way through the firm. It’s such a large organisation — about 11,000 people work here — and there are lots of different departments: tax, audit, forensic and so on. If you’re in audit and you want a secondment in another area, it takes you to make those contacts. Within forensic, when I wanted a secondment, I identified people I needed to speak to, had meetings with them, then spoke with my department. You need to be self-motivated and do things yourself.

What is the typical career path in your industry?

The main trend is to do training for three years and get your qualification. You can’t really do secondments until you’ve passed all your exams. Then you can either move within the firm, or work in another area – work in forensics for example. Lots of people go abroad, while other people work in corporate recovery, corporate finance, etc. Some people leave and work in industry.

The two main paths are to either move into other departments within the firm, or move into industry. Some people from my old office went to work for investment banks.

What is your favourite part of the job?

Variety. If you do push for things and make the right contacts, you can get very varied work. Every six months I present an audit business game to university students. I also take part in a numeracy programme that we run, going through exercises with some secondary school students some lunch times. Working in forensics is also very interesting, checking whether people are working within regulations etc – also quite varied.

What is your least favourite part of the job?

If you want to have that much variety you have to manage your own time a lot. I’m expected to deliver on certain commitments, so I have to inform people that I won’t be available for an hour here or there. You do feel guilty if you have to disappear for an hour here or there when you’re trying to give 100 percent to the job.

How relevant is your education to what you are doing today?

In terms of my experience, Maths and Economics, Economics has helped me get a broader understanding of what I’m doing. In terms of Maths, I can’t really relate things like calculus to what I’m doing, but it makes you more numerate. The things you learn outside of the classroom at university help, like being independent and self-driven. Also socialising, making friends and joining groups. That’s what makes you a good employee. It’s not all about knowing your subject thoroughly. The soft skills I learned help the most.

Can you offer any advice to graduates seeking a career in the accounting profession?

Do your research and make sure you understand what working day is like. The resources are a hell of a lot better than they were when I was doing research six years ago. Find out about the qualification itself. I’d also say speak to people who are already doing it, if you can get in touch with people at the companies, do that. I’m on a contact database so people at university can get in touch with me.

Go to careers fairs where you can speak to someone face to face and get a good idea of the culture from that. The experience can be very different with different firms, even though it’s the same qualification. It’s very important that you can see whether you’d like to work in that environment and whether it’s an employer that you want to work for.

What is something unusual that they might not know?

It may no longer be an issue, but if you live in the regions and don’t request which market sector you want to work in within KPMG, you’re allotted to a department. I wasn’t aware that’s what happened. I then didn’t get to select which area I worked in. In interviews you should ask if it’ll be divided by market, and whether you can choose which area.

In the London office, because it’s so large, that option is built in.

What is your favourite perk?

25 days of holiday and the opportunity to buy a week extra.

courtesy: http://www.vault.com/wps/portal/usa/vcm/detail/Career-Advice/Q&A/Q&A:-Assistant-Manager-at-KPMG?id=4906&filter_type=0&filter_id=0

Cyber Crime website to help a Layman get acquianted with some usual online threats !


Today, we all are associated with Cyber related crimes in a way or other.
A must visit website for a layman to understand Cyber threats in a simple lingo ….. be it your simple email A/c, Online Banking, Lottery Scams, silly VIRUSES, Mobile surfing or just Internet surfing restrictions. @ Cyber Crime, you will get familiar with all that benefits you.
Bolo, Cyber Baba ki Jai !!!!
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