WordPress widget for Publicizing Blog Posts on facebook/Twitter is just a click away.


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Image via CrunchBase

WordPress has introduced this wonderful feature that enables blogger’s posts/articles to get published on Facebook & Twitter  automatically….

The idea of self-publishing itself is just amazing. In today’s SEO centric Internet arena,  this widget is goig t make the life of a blogger fetch some relief.

http://en.blog.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/now-publicize-to-facebook-pages

How does it work  huhh ??

Facebook @ Mobile

Go to your wp BLOG’s  dashboard, Settings, and Sharing you’ll see Publicize. Once you set it up, Publicize works automatically.

You can customize the message that gets sent out on the Post page.

See http://en.support.wordpress.com/publicize/

I came across wish list of a WordPress user (Salil Lawande), who is seeking wp team to introduce below mentioned widgets.

Wishlist:
> Ability to tag media in the Media Library
> Albums functionality (or something close to what Picasa Web Albums)
> Sorting by month, year, title
> A graphical/visual approach to managing & deploying media (drag & drop)

Happy Blogging.

Go Blogger Go.

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Picto-ry of Web evolution…. (tired of writing words) :P


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9 Tips to find your next job & keep yourself alive during job search


1. Network! Think of the people you know — relatives, friends, professors, classmates, co-workers at summer jobs, and others. Make more of an effort to meet with people, and use these conversations to ask their advice, to make them aware of your job search, to learn more about their jobs or their organizations, and to get the names of others who might be useful in your job search.


2. Target your Résumé. Make sure your résumé is targeted to the employers who receive it. Make sure your résumé is easy to read and the most important details stand out. Make more than one résumé if you are applying to more than one industry.

3. Be prepared. You should have a copy of your résumé at all times. It is also a good idea to have fresh copies of your résumé prepared in case you are called to an interview at the last minute.

4. Create a contact database. Write down all the employers you contact, the date you sent your résumé, any contact made, people you talk to, and notes about those contacts. Keep a notepad with you at all times — take notes as soon as you hear about an opportunity or when you leave an interview. Get into the habit of updating your database daily.

5. Learn how to talk about yourself. Throughout your job search you will speak with many people at different levels. You must be comfortable having conversations about yourself with other people. Keep in mind that you never know who may end up being useful to your job hunt.

6. Prepare an elevator speech. You never know who you’ll meet in an elevator, in line at the coffee shop, or on the street. Know what your skills are and how to communicate them. You should be able to tell prospective employers and others you meet what you can offer. You should also be able to talk about how your skills relate to the industries that interest you.

7. Find out all there is about employers in your field. Remain current on any issues or developments in the field, read trade journals or professional publications, and read the newspaper. It is extremely impressive during an interview if you know about the latest merger or coup in the industry.

8. Follow-up with leads immediately. If you find out about a position late in the day, call right then. Don’t wait until the next day.

9. Stay confident. Job hunting takes time and energy. Remain confident, but prepare yourself for challenges ahead. Don’t get disgruntled if you are still looking for a job and it seems like everyone you know has an offer. Most students find their jobs after graduation.

http://www.thetopjobsites.com/Job-Tips.html

13 Networking Mistakes made by Individuals


You wouldn’t wear jeans to a job interview, but do you pay as much attention to job-hunting etiquette when networking? If you’re approaching potential contacts in an offhand way, you may be putting them off entirely. Learn what the most common networking mistakes are so you don’t have to make them.

Waiting

Many people start networking only after they’ve lost their jobs. Effective networking means creating contacts and relationships while you’re still employed.

Being Clueless

If you’re heading to a networking event, make sure you know why you’re going. Do you want a job? If so, are you seeking something specific, or will anything do? Are you looking for contacts or a mentor to provide guidance? As soon as someone starts talking with you, you have to hold up your end of the conversation. If you don’t know what you want, you can’t do that.

Being Unprepared

Thinking you know what you want is not the same as knowing it. Treat networking the same way you would an appearance at Carnegie Hall. Practice your pitch as well as your answers to questions about your career goals that might arise.

Forgetting Business Cards

There is nothing more embarrassing than establishing a good relationship with someone, extracting a pledge of help and then searching around for a cocktail napkin to write on. Spend a few extra bucks to print professional-looking cards on good-quality paper.

Using a Silly-Sounding Email Name

Sure, your friends know you as “SexyMama4U” or “TimeForHemp,” but when looking for work, stick to a serious email address, such as your real name.

Being Pompous

While you’re networking, you need to listen to what everyone else is saying. People help by offering advice. They are not interested in hearing how much you already know.

Monopolizing Someone’s Time

At a networking event, everyone wants to mingle. And if you’re networking over the phone or by email, understand that the person you’re speaking with has a life that extends beyond you.

Dressing Down

Look sharp at networking events. Mind your manners, shake hands firmly, stand up straight, make eye contact and show respect in any way you can. A networking event can be a dress rehearsal for a job interview, but no one will help you get your foot in the door if you give the impression that you’ll slouch through it once it’s open.

Being a Wallflower

Men and women with contacts and power meet many people; they remember only those who stand out from the crowd. Be assertive, and act like a leader. But don’t go overboard. You want to convey self-assurance, not obnoxiousness.

Being Passive

If someone says, “Sorry, we don’t have anything right now,” take a minute or two to ask follow-up questions: “Well, what’s the outlook for future possibilities? Do you know anyone else in the industry who might have something? Any thoughts on what my next step should be?” Persistence shows true interest on your part and may help the person you’re networking with come up with ideas he might otherwise overlook.

Lying

It’s tempting to say, “So-and-So gave me your name and told me to call.” It might even get you a meeting. But eventually Such-and-Such will learn that So-and-So did not tell you to call. And you’ll have burned not one, but two bridges.

Treating Your Networking Relationships as Short-Term Flings

No one likes to be used. Follow up every conversation with a thank-you note, email or call. Let your contact know whether his suggestions panned out or not. When your job search ends — for whatever reason — inform the person who has helped you. You may think your networking is over, but your paths may cross again.

Forgetting Where You Came From

Anyone who has ever networked, whether successfully or not, owes an obligation to all those who will network in the future. Return the favor and help someone else.

By Dan Woog, Monster Contributing Writer

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