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Interestingly fake email sent on behalf of RBI (Reserve Bank of India) via & by fraudualant mail ID


These days, I’ve developed an interim interest in checking out SPAM emails in my mailbox. There are plenty of mails to browse through. be it UK Lottery Scams, International Monetary Fund (IMF) fund Transfer, swiss bank transfers, Break-up notifications from some chick n what not…..

The Symbol of Indian Rupee approved by the Uni...

Indian Rupee Image via Wikipedia

I was very much surprised to read a mail from RBI PLC (rbifundstransfer@rediffmail.com). It didnt take me more than 1/1000 th of a second to think …

“since when RBI has become a PLC”….. Reserve Bank of India Private Limited Company !!!


To add -up some more spice to my entertainment, the mail had email-ID smitha.a24@gmail.com in TO field instead of my emial-ID…. Seems like some Indian Name is used as signatory authority.

ha hhaa haa…… Do go through the mail as copied below…… the language is so funny…. just hang on to the email ahead        🙂

(p.s. DO NOT FALL PRAY to SUCH falsified EMAILS & HELP in CREATING AWARENESS to ERADICATE such ACTIVITIES).

<<<<<<< =================================== >>>>>>

<<<<<<<  =================================== >>>>>>

RESERVE BANK OF INDIA

India ‘s Central Bank

DEPOSITED OF YOUR FUND TO RBI FOR TRANSFER TO YOUR ACCOUNT.

This is to bring to your notice that we have received a cheque of 500,000 Pounds (FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND POUNDS) on behalf of TOYOTA AUTOMOBILE COMPANY in United Kingdom from (DIPLOMATIC MR MORGAN RICHIE) Pacific courier company some days ago, But we could not inform you due to the investigation that was going on about the cheque of 500,000 pounds

This is a very huge amount and has you know that there is a lot of cheque frauds going on all over the world, that is why he took us some time to confirmed that the cheque we received is okay because we don’t want to be fraud in our bank.

We contact the British Government to be aware of this issue should be incase we later face any problem or fraud regarding this payment but the British Government give us 100% assurance that if any problem occur they will be responsible for it and they agree with us.

On behalf of Reserve bank of India (RBI) want to congratulate you has we have confirmed that the cheque is 100% okay that is why we inform you to let you know that cheque is with us.

This is the information and the batch details that i we received from the pacific courier company in other to claim the money for you….

Ref Number: EUM DN 0508-9T6

Batch Number: EUM QY-3LJ4

Serial Number: 20910

YOU ARE TO GET BACK TO US WITH THIS INFORMATION BELOW..

VERIFICATIONSFORM

FULL NAMES:

CONTACT ADDRESS:

TEL/FAX NUMBERS:

AGE:

SEX:

OCCUPATION:

POST CODE:

COUNTRY /CITY /STATE: INDIA

PLEASE FORWARD YOUR INFORMATION TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS BELOW: reservebankindia_remittance@yahoo.in

Looking forward to read from you soonest.

Your’s Sincerely,

MR PRAKASH SHARMA

FOREIGN EXCHANGE REMITTANCE DEPT

R.B.I, INDIA

India’s Black Money 2011: Finance minister Pranab Mukherjee said the tax department would launch prosecution proceedings in relevant cases from the names of account holders given by foreign banks


The news headline in Livemint & Hindustan Times reveals latest update on India’s Black Money…… here is the full article

*****  The PIL claims this is a “colossal failure to enforce the law” due to influential politicians in various parties being involved in the offences. *****

New Delhi: Ahead of a Supreme Court hearing on a public interest litigation (PIL) on black money, finance minister Pranab Mukherjee at a press conference on Tuesday detailed the government’s strategy to deal with black money and said the tax department would launch prosecution proceedings in relevant cases from amongst names of account holders given by foreign banks.

Pranab Mukherjee, Indian politician, current F...

Image via Wikipedia

 

The government has the names of account holders in Liechtenstein’s LGT Bank and information given by German banks.

Mukherjee refused to name account holders citing secrecy clauses attached to legal frameworks with different countries which are used to obtain information on Indian account holders in foreign banks.

The information, however, has been given to the Supreme Court in a “sealed envelope,” Mukherjee, said. The names would be revealed when the tax department launches prosecution proceedings in relevant cases, he added.

The Supreme Court on 27 January resumes hearing a PIL on black money being held in European banks by Indians, initiated by senior lawyer Ram Jethmalani along with some former civil servants, who want the court to examine the issue as well as the falling standards of administration on the part of the government.

The PIL claims this is a “colossal failure to enforce the law” due to influential politicians in various parties being involved in the offences.

According to Mukherjee, the press conference had its roots in a suggestion by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh asking the finance ministry to place in public domain the strategy to deal with black money. Singh had made the suggestion during a recent cabinet meeting which discussed amendments India had signed with its tax partners to elicit information on foreign bank accounts of Indians.

During a hearing on 19 January, the Supreme Court took a tough position against the union government, asking it why it was not disclosing the names of Indian citizens who allegedly stashed away large sums of unaccounted money in European banks from 2002 to 2006.

The main pillar of the government’s strategy to deal with the problem is to amend tax treaties with different countries to allow for information on bank details to be shared.

Indian Money

Image via Wikipedia

According to Mukherjee, a change in international opinion in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis had played a positive role in amending treaties. 

The G-20 countries had decided to jointly take on countries or tax jurisdictions, which were reluctant to share critical information, Mukherjee, said.

sanjiv.s@livemint.com

http://www.livemint.com/2011/01/25144003/Black-Money–Pranab-says-can.html?h=E

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Black-money-Pranab-to-appear-before-Parliamentary-panel/H1-Article1-655117.aspx

US Government Launches Anti-Fraud Site (StopFraud.gov) (via economics)


Here we get to read about the interesting & much required initiative taken by Obama’s US Government by launching StopFraud.gov
a website to educate individuals & reveal various actions of Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force.

stopfraud.gov

President Obama’s Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force has introduced a new Web site to educate Americans about how to protect themselves from fraud and report instances of fraud. The site, StopFraud.gov, will also provide information about the task force’s work. Obama established the interagency task force to wage a coordinated effort to investigate and prosecute financial crimes. The task force includes representatives from a broad range of f … Read More

via economics

e-promotion by ICICI Bank against Phishing mails !!


Kindly make a note of Phishing mails that can hack into your precious bank / Monetary accounts & fetch-out free money.

]

I myself had received such mailers from IDBI Bank asking for personal banking details. On the follow-up with Bank’s Top  officials over mail, it was found that the respective hacking bug was blocked & de-activated.

Here are a few Forensic Triggers mention in the web-poster of ICICI Bank, which is pretty much enlightening.

  • The email ID domain might appear to be Bank name / familiar company / friend’s ID.
  • On moving  the cursor onto the sender’s address, it would reveal mis-matching characters in the URL.
  • The padlock (Security protection) icon would be missing.
  • Generally, mailer will mention the urgent step-by-step action required in order to avoid shut-down of account.
  • It will ask for secret information like user ID, passwords, PINs, CVV number, Credit/Debit Card number, vbyv passcode details, etc.

    Money going e-line

    Phishing Mail

 
 
  Dear Customer, You must have heard of ‘Phishing’ ! It is a trap laid by fraudsters through e-mail. If you reply to the e-mail, you might be ‘phished’ of your confidential banking/credit-card details and end up losing your hard-earned money.

The way to protect yourself against phishing is to identify a phishing e-mail. If you suspect an e-mail to be a phishing attempt, forward it to antiphishing@icicibank.com, and delete from your mailbox. Do not respond to such mails.

 
     
 
 
 
For more details on Phishing, please click here.
 
  Sincerely,
ICICI Bank Ltd.
   
 
epromotion against PHISHING by icici Bank

p.s. – Original structure is modified as to suit the formatting.

 

 

INSURANCE ACTUARIES: Just How Much Fraud Is There?


Let’s start off with a simple explanation of why fraud costs us all money. Insurance companies employ math-geeks called actuaries. They spend their time estimating how many traffic accidents there are likely to be and how much all the claims will be worth in a year. That total is divided among all the policy holders as the premium. It’s all guesswork but they are good guessers. Except that, when thousands of people make false claims, the insurers suddenly find themselves short of money to pay out. The result? Premium rates go up for all.

How bad is the problem? In New York, the number of suspected cases of fraud has risen by one-third from 2007 through 2009. Across the state, the insurers identified 13,433 probable cases of fraud in 2009 alone. To pay for this, the premium rates rose by an average of 6.3% in 2009. The most common frauds are staging an accident to claim medical expenses. This has caused the average value of each claim to rise to more than double the national average. That’s millions of dollars paid out and millions of dollars that have to replaced in the capital reserves. This problem is not, of course, unique to New York. It has become a well-recognized way of raising cash as the recession has deepened. So, if people find their household budgets under pressure, they can report their vehicle stolen or become the victim in a phantom hit-and-run. Ah, but you are saying all this needs support from attorneys and physicians prepared to push claims knowing or suspecting their clients are faking or exaggerating. Well, let’s keep this real. The FBI and local law enforcement agencies regularly run undercover sting operations to catch the fraudulent. In Philadelphia, for example, a recent operation resulted in long jail terms for an attorney and thirty-four individuals falsely claiming millions based on fake medical evidence. In Santa Clara County, California, the police recently prosecuted more than twenty body shops for supplying false estimates to insurance companies. An undercover officer driving an undamaged Honda Civic explained he had reported the vehicle vandalized to pay for a new paint job. The body shops supplied an estimate under $3,000 — insurance companies do not inspect damage for “small” claims.

The truth is there’s an epidemic of fraud and it’s not only established criminals or those on the fringe of legality like street racers. But, sadly, it’s also becoming a mom-and-pop crime. Why? Because the cost of investigating every claim as possible fraud is too expensive for the insurers. It’s cheaper to pay out all the smaller claims and absorb the losses. This is one of the main reasons why it’s getting harder to find cheap auto insurance. The volume of fraud is driving up the premium rates for everyone. But there’s a secondary problem. Outside California, insurance companies still use zip codes in setting rates. Where the levels of fraud are high in some areas, the rates reflect this. So, those who live in the Bronx and Brooklyn pay more than other parts of New York because there are more fake claims. This does not mean it’s impossible to find cheap car insurance. You just have to work harder, using a site like this, to identify those insurance companies offering good discounts. As another self-help step, you could report all those you know are making false claims. If the police and FBI cannot stem the flood of fraud, it’s up to every law-abiding citizen to step up to the plate. The result will be lower premiums for all.

by: Norris Rios

http://article-niche.com

Banking and Politics in Fraud – Fall of the Giant: Banco Intercontinental (or BANINTER


This is an interesting piece of Fraud case listed on Wikipedia that catches our attention upon how the econo-political environment of a country can damage giant business entitites

Banco Intercontinental (or BANINTER) was the second largest privately held commercial bank in the Dominican Republic before collapsing in 2003 in a spectacular fraud tied to political corruption. The resulting deficit of more than US$2.2 billion was equal to 12% to 15% of the Dominican national gross domestic product.[1] The size of the bank meltdown and the mishandling of it by the administration of former President Hipólito Mejía contributed materially to the Dominican economy entering a prolonged steep decline. However, the underlying fraudulent bookeeping and political influence peddling had been ongoing for many years and through the administrations of all major Dominican political parties. Current President Leonel Fernández had previously been hired as an outside counsel for the bank.[citation needed]

Ramón Báez Figueroa and expansion of BANINTER

Banco Intercontinental was created in 1986 by Ramón Báez Romano, a businessman and former Industry Minister. His oldest son, Ramón Báez Figueroa, took over the small bank and helped build it into the country’s number two private commercial bank. BANINTER grew quickly into a typical family-run conglomerate, buying up companies or controlling interests in firms that touched on nearly every aspect of Dominican life.

In the process, Báez Figueroa amassed an empire of varied businesses. Through BANINTER Group, he managed to control the country’s largest media group, including Listín Diario, the oldest and leading newspaper; four television stations, a cable television company, and more than 70 radio stations.

Báez Figueroa became a man of great influence and power. At his lavish wedding, former Presidents Joaquín Balaguer and Leonel Fernandez signed the marriage document as witnesses. In late 2000, Báez even proposed a “national economic program”, which earned him much praise from President Mejía.

“Risk, and I’m talking about calculated risk, is proper of all business and of any human activity. “Whoever doesn’t understand this can’t triumph” Báez said in a 2001 interview in a Dominican business magazine Mercado.[2].

His more than generous gifts to friends, business partners, journalists, commentators, models, beauty queens, military personnel, judges, and politicians over the years became legendary, as were his patronage for many events.[citation needed] former president Mejía got a bulletproof Lexus sports utility vehicle; so did his successor, Leonel Fernández. Colonel Pedro Julio Goico Guerrero (a.k.a. Pepe Goico), who served as Mejía’s Head of Security and who guarded former U.S. president Bill Clinton on visits to the United States, got ten solid-gold President Rolex watches worth US$15,000 each and use of a credit card that the bank would pay off.[citation needed]

Later on, Báez himself would denounce that he called a US$2.4 million credit-card fraud on the part of Colonel Pepe Goico. Although the credit card was issued in Goico’s name, it was meant solely to finance presidential trips. Instead, Báez charged, Goico and his cronies used the card for personal purchases, including planes and helicopters, luxury housing and jewelry. The “Pepe-Gate” may have been the spark, but a mountain of kindling had been piling up for years around BANINTER.

Bank crisis

BANINTER’s octopus-like acquisitiveness raised some eyebrows, as did Báez’s luxurious tastes. In 2002 he bought a US$14,600,000 yacht, the Patricia.[3][4] Moreover, Báez had personal expenses of more than US$1,000,000 monthly.[citation needed].

Speculation about the source of Báez’s fortune ran wild, but nobody considered the explanation being given nowadays by the Dominican authority, that Báez was robbing his own bank.

Rumors that BANINTER might’ve been in trouble began circulating during the fall of 2002, and depositors started to withdraw their savings. The Dominican Central Bank stepped in to support the bank by providing new lines of credit. Anxious for a permanent solution, the government announced in early 2003 that Banco del Progreso, run by Pedro Castillo Lefeld, the brother of Mejía’s son-in-law, would acquire BANINTER. But Banco del Progreso abruptly withdrew from the deal. Government officials said that two-thirds of the money that customers had deposited in BANINTER was kept off its official books by a custom-designed software system.

On April 7, 2003, the government took control of BANINTER. Báez Figueroa’s family owned more than the 80% of the bank, and soon after, a deeper examination supported by the International Monetary Fund and the Inter-American Development Bank, revealed the scale of the meltdown.

Báez Figueroa was arrested on May 15, 2003 along with BANINTER vice presidents Marcos Báez Cocco and Vivian Lubrano de Castillo, the secretary of the Board of Directors, Jesús M. Troncoso, and wealthy financier Luis Alvarez Renta, on charges of bank fraud, money laundering and concealing information from the government as part of a massive fraud scheme of more than RD$ 55 billion (USD $2.2 billion). This sum would be big anywhere, but it was overwhelming for the Dominican economy, equivalent to two-thirds of its national budget.

The resulting central bank bailout spurred a 30% annual inflation and a large increase in poverty. The government was forced to devalue the peso, triggering the collapse of two other banks, and prompting a US$600 million (euro$420 million) loan package from the International Monetary Fund.[5]

Though required by the country’s Monetary Laws to only guarantee individual deposits of up to RD$500,000 Dominican Pesos (about US$21,000 at the time) placed within the country, the Dominican Central Bank (Banco Central Dominicano) opted to guarantee all $2.2B in unbacked BANINTER deposits, regardless of the amount, or whether deposits were in Dominican Pesos or American Dollars and without apparent knowledge whether the deposits were held in the Dominican Republic or in BANINTER’s branches in the Cayman Islands and Panama. The subsequent fiscal shortfall resulted in massive inflation (42%) and the devaluation of the DOP by over 100%.

Former president Mejía and the Central Bank (Banco Central) stated that the unlimited payouts to depositors were to protect the Dominican banking system from a crisis of confidence and potential chain reaction. However, the overall consequence of the bailout was to reimburse the wealthiest of Domincan depositors, some of whom had received rates of interest as high as 27% annually, at the expense of the majority of poor Dominicans—the latter of whom would be required to pay the cost of the bailout through inflation, currency devaluation, government austerity plans and higher taxes over the coming years.

Aftermath and trial

The banking crisis ignited harsh fights over BANINTER group’s media outlets, including the prominent newspaper Listín Diario, which was temporarily seized and run by the Mejía administration following the bank collapse.[5] In 2003, TV commentator Rafael Acevedo, president of the opinion polling firm Gallup Dominicana, had said that in the BANINTER scandal “there has been much complicity at every level of society: the government, the media, the church, the military.”[2].

In November 2005, Alvarez Renta was found liable by a federal jury in Miami of civil racketeering and illegal money transfers in a conspiracy to loot BANINTER during its final months of existence. Alvarez Renta was ordered to pay $177 Million to the Dominican state. To this date, he still hasn’t paid that sum.

The main executives of BANINTER, Báez Figueroa, his cousin Marcos Báez Cocco, Vivian Lubrano, Jesús Troncoso Ferrúa, as well as the aforementioned Alvarez Renta, were prosecuted by the Dominican state for fraud and money laundering, among other criminal charges. Báez Figueroa’s main attorney is Marino Vinicio Castillo, who at the present time holds the position of President Fernandez’s Drugs Consultant.

With 350 prosecutions and defense witnesses slated to testify, ex- president Hipólito Mejía among them, the criminal proceedings against Báez Figueroa began on April 2, 2006. However, the Court decided to postpone the first hearing for May 19, 2006, accepting a motion by the defense lawyers.[6] It was prompted, as detailed at length in the trial by a scandal involving debt writeoffs and sweetheart loans or other financial deals suspected of having favored leading politicians and others.[7]

What remains most curious was that the fraud went undetected for 14 years by the country’s supposed financial gatekeepers—the Central Bank, the Superintendent of Banks and U. S. accounting company PricewaterhouseCoopers. How Báez Figueroa and his cronies were accused and some convicted of pulling it off provided a glimpse into the gift-giving and favor-swapping common between private business and top government officials in the Dominican Republic.

The first trial ended in September 2007.

Sentence and criticism

On October 21, 2007, Báez Figueroa was sentenced by a three-judge panel to 10 years in prison. Additionally, he was ordered to pay restitution and damages totalling RD$63 billion. The laundering charges were excluded, but the other suspected mastermind of the fraud, Luis Alvarez Renta, was convicted and sentenced to 10 years in prison for money laundering.[8] Marcos Báez Cocco, ex-vicepresident of the Bank, was also found guilty, and sentenced to 8 years.

The accusations against two other defendants, former BANINTER executive Vivian Lubrano, as well as the secretary of BANINTER Board of Directors Jesús M. Troncoso, were dismissed for lack of evidence.

The sentence has been widely criticized for its severe contradictions, but more specially because it’s been alleged that the judges were pressed by “the powers that be”. Noted journalist Miguel Guerrero wrote in his column of the daily El Caribe that the defrauders of BANINTER have been protected “by a dark combination of political, economic, mediatic and ecclesiastical powers” and that the sentence was a mamotreto“.[9] In fact, Guerrero went to the extent of saying that everything was fixed beforehand, and the defendants and their lawyers knew it, as did those representing the Central Bank.

Court of Appeals and Supreme Court decisions

In February 2008, the case went to the Court of Appeals of Santo Domingo and the Court upheld the sentence against Báez Figueroa, Báez Cocco and Alvarez Renta. The decision that had favored Vivian Lubrano was reverted, and she was sentenced to five years in prison and RD$18 billion in damages. Charges against Troncoso Ferrua were definitely dropped.

In July 2008, the Dominican Supreme Court confirmed the decision against the defendants.[10]

Nevertheless, Lubrano allegedly fell into a “deep depression” and suffered from “panic attacks”, and she never went to prison. After much debate, President Leonel Fernández gave her full pardon, on December 22, 2008.[11]

References

  1. ^ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC ECONOMY THREATENED BY MASSIVE BANK FRAUD. | Company Activities & Management > Company Structures & Ownership from AllBusiness.com
  2. ^ a b Hurricane Ramoncito: how Ramon Baez and his cronies broke the Dominican Republic’s largest bank—and almost brought down the country – Top 100 Banks | Latin Trade | Find Articles at BNET.com
  3. ^ Dominican Government seeks failed bank’s assets in Grand Cayman – DominicanToday.com
  4. ^ http://powerandmotoryacht.com/megayachts/0902patricia/index.aspx Yacht Patricia
  5. ^ a b http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071021/ap_on_bi_ge/dominican_bank_fraud_trial_1
  6. ^ Dominicant Today, April 3, 2006
  7. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20071021/bs_nm/dominican_fraud_dc_2
  8. ^ Business finance news – currency market news – online UK currency markets – financial news – Interactive Investor
  9. ^ http://www.elcaribecdn.com/articulo_multimedios.aspx?id=141702&guid=EF04DB20333D4739BC301542550DEA80&Seccion=134 El Caribe, October 23, 2007.
  10. ^ Hoy
  11. ^ Diario Libre

External links

  • BANINTER promotion.
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